Cat

Can Cats Really Recognize Their Names?

Cats are intelligent, independent, and aloof. They can do a lot of things, but are you wondering why they don’t listen when we call their names?

Cats are intelligent creatures – they are observant, vigilant, and always alert. But if that were true, why do they seem indifferent towards many things? Why do most of them ignore their names when they’re called?

First, we probably think this way because we are so used to comparing them with dogs.

To understand cats better, we need to realize that they perceive themselves differently.

Dogs are affectionate while cats are apathetic. While dogs excitedly anticipate their owner’s arrival from work, cats seem unperturbed of their day-long absence.

However, this doesn’t mean they’re not happy to see them. It just means that they’re too busy being the boss and that they are also reserved.

Cat’s DO recognize their names

That’s right. Experiments made in single-cat homes and multi-cat homes show that cats can recognize their names.

However, they are very selective when it comes to being responsive. Oftentimes, they understand that they’re being called but they choose to ignore you because they assume that it’s nothing important.

They will turn their heads and look at you, but they won’t be bothered for anything.

If they don’t see you offering something that interests them such as toys or treats, they’re more likely to go back to whatever they were doing and disregard you.

They will often respond to their own name when they know it’s feeding time, or if they hear the sound of their cat bowls being filled with kibbles.

If cats were humans, they are not the type to make small talks and they won’t be chatty either. This is because their decisions are only based on their natural instincts, unlike dogs whose main goal in life is to please you.

How to get their attention

It is a good idea to use a clicker – a device that is used to train cats to anticipate something good. It is often used to teach cats simple tricks.

The clicker is clicked before giving rewards such as treats or belly rubs. Once they associate the click with positive reinforcement, they will begin to respond to it.

You may even find it easier to call them through using a clicker than by calling their names.

Another way to get their attention is to play with them. Use yarn or a flashlight since they are always enticed by swift, unpredictable movements.

Cats often appear indifferent. But if you pay close attention to their body language, you will know how much they enjoy your company and how much you mean to them.

They are not very demonstrative of their feelings, so it’s up to you to learn how to interpret their actions.

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